Neil H. Greenberg & Associates, P.C.

Ikea’s Voluntary Pay Raise Experiment Deemed a Success

This photo taken Wednesday, June 3, 2015, shows an IKEA store in Miami. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

This photo taken Wednesday, June 3, 2015, shows an IKEA store in Miami. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

June  25, 2015– In March of 2015 this forum reported that regardless of the contentious minimum wage battles that have been plaguing the City, State, and Federal governments this year that some major corporate employers were voluntarily implementing pay increases for their hourly workers. (http://newyorkovertimelaw.com/blog/10-companies-that-have-vowed-to-raise-their-minimum-wage/)  Ikea, the furniture giant,  was one of the employers on that list.  The preliminary results of their voluntary wage experiment have been examined and what they reveal is dramatic and enlightening.

Ikea’s Chief Financial Officer, Rob Olson, has announced that as a result of the positive consequences of their voluntary wage increases that they intend to implement a second round of such wage hikes.   Ikea’s pay increase structure was based upon the relative cost of living in the various jurisdictions where it maintained stores.  Stores where the cost of living was the highest implemented more aggressive increases, creating greater financial parity among its U.S. Employees.

Olson made the announcement after summarizing what Ikea saw as the noticeable benefits to their company following the  implementation of the increase.   The first was a dramatic decrease in employee turnover from prior to the increase.  This factor alone reduced the company’s spending on the recruitment and training of new employees, whereby, balancing the cost increases of higher salaries.  Perhaps less tangible but, maybe, more significant was what Olson cited as the ability to recruit more qualified candidates for open positions.   The increase resulted in a noticeable increase in the hiring of more qualified applicants, which resulted in better employees, according to Olson.

So, while others debate the positive and negative consequences of wage increases and their impact on corporate employers Ikea seems to have settled the question as to whether major employers can sustain the impact of wage increases for their lowest earners.  They, clearly, can.

To view the entire article: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/06/24/ikea-minimum-wage_n_7648804.html

The Minimum Wage Battle Heats Up In NY

Credit Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

Credit Chang W. Lee/The New York Times

June 18, 2015– The Minimum wage battle heated up this week in New York as Fast Food workers filled an auditorium on New York University’s campus to testify before a panel appointed by Governor Andrew Cuomo to examine the wage issue.  This hearing comes on the heals of last week’s historic increase in Los Angeles to $15 per hour for their minimum wage. ( See http://newyorkovertimelaw.com/blog/los-angeles-becomes-largest-city-to-enact-15-wage-law/)

At the hearing more than 30 Fast Food and other workers testified about their inability to survive, live, and afford housing on the wages they earn under the current economic scheme.   They, boldly, are seeking an increase from $8.75 per hour to $15 per hour in order to offset the economic disparity between their wages and their cost of living.

NYC’s Mayor, Bill De Blasio, and Governor Andrew Cuomo have been vocal advocates of this historic increase for the 180,000 Fast Food workers residing and working in New York State.  Despite the opposition of major employers over the alleged adverse economic impact of these significant wage changes it is expected that increases will be announced shortly.  The Los Angeles increase seems to have been the momentum shift these East Coast workers were looking for.

To read the entire NY Times Article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/16/nyregion/board-hears-support-for-raising-food-workers-minimum-wage.html?_r=1

Los Angeles Becomes Largest City to Enact $15 Wage Law

“Los Angeles - Feb 9, 2014: View Of Hollywood Boulevard In Sunset” by David Castillo Dominici

“Los Angeles – Feb 9, 2014: View Of Hollywood Boulevard In Sunset” by David Castillo Dominici

June 11, 2015-While the nation debates the issue and large companies promise some movement on their minimum wage floor, the City of Los Angeles has acted, and acted swiftly.   Wednesday night, by an overwhelming majority, the City Council voted to increase the City minimum wage to $15 per hour.  While the measure still needs to be signed into law by Los Angeles mayor, Eric Garcetti, he has already indicated that he will do so without hesitation.

This increase makes the minimum wage in Los Angeles double the Federal Standard and on parity with only a few jurisdictions.   The size and visibility of the city make the increase historic.  Mayor Garcetti and Mayor De Blasio of New York City have have both been vocal advocates of this change, yet, New York City’s leader has not managed to garner enough support to accomplish this goal.   It remains to be seen if this change on the West Coast will prompt a similar response in the East.

While labor advocates have applauded the action, many large employers have renounced it as crippling to their profitability during a time when the economy is still fragile.  Overtures are already being made to engage in massive lay-offs or corporate relocations.  The impact on these employers may not be as significant as these companies would have the public believe as the increase phases in over the course of several years, with provisions to extend the commencement time for smaller employers.

While the impact of the increase is being debated labor advocates and businesses will be keenly focused on signs of the impact on the Los Angeles economy and how it relates to the rest of the national employment picture.

To read the entire story:

http://americasmarkets.usatoday.com/2015/06/10/10-an-hour-minimum-wage-passed-in-la/?utm_source=feedblitz&utm_medium=FeedBlitzRss&utm_campaign=usatodaycommoney-topstories

A Tale of Two Companies- Amazon Hires 6k Workers While Cisco Lays Off Same

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May 29, 2015-Two high profile U.S. based Corporations made very distinct and contrasting employment statements today.  Amazon announced the hiring of 6,000 workers in the United States while Cisco Systems announced they were laying off the very same number, 6000.

Amazon’s hiring will increase it’s fulfillment center workforce by approximately 10% in the United States.  Hiring in this segment of Amazon’s business will be to meet the growing demand for order fulfillment at its 50 Distribution Centers around the country.

Meanwhile Cisco Systems, the computer networking company,  will reduce it’s workforce the same figure, or approximately 8% of its workforce, to address financial restructuring of the company in difficult economic times.

The contrast between the two companies is a microcosm of the rollercoaster that has been the United States economy for the past several years; up and down.   For New York State workers the news has a particularly bad impact as none of the Amazon jobs will be in New York yet Cisco Systems is a New York based company.

To find out more:

http://www.industryweek.com/workforce/cisco-cut-6000-jobs

http://phys.org/news/2015-05-amazon-hires-6k-full-time-workers.html

New York State Nail Salons Come Under Fire For Worker Abuses

Courtesy of Freedigitalimages.net

Courtesy of Freedigitalimages.net

May 21, 2015– On a daily basis, women, and often men, across the City of New York patronize one of 2,000 nail salons in order to treat themselves to grooming at the hands of professional manicurists. The customers, often financially middle and upper class individuals, shell out significant fees for these periodic treatments in luxurious salons by industrious workers skilled at the art of beautifying their clients’ nails through the art of manicure and pedicure. Despite the, sometimes, exorbitant fees paid New York City residents for this service, a recent study has revealed that many of the workers performing the pricey services have been subject to extreme wage and hour abuses at the hands of their employers.

According to a NY Times survey of 150 nail salons in NYC, “a vast majority of workers are paid below minimum wage; sometimes they are not even paid. Workers endure all manner of humiliation, including having their tips docked as punishment for minor transgressions, constant video monitoring by owners, even physical abuse.”

In addition to wage related employment abuses recent studies have revealed that salon workers are exposed to various, toxic chemicals associated with the trade without the benefit of proper training, proper safety equipment, sufficient ventilation, or a proper understanding of the hazards they are exposed to.

New York State, and New York City in particular, has the highest per capita of the, over, 17,000 nail salons found throughout the United States. With the high cost of living in New York, the $1.50 per hour that is estimated to be the prevailing wage, including tips, for these workers is far below any established poverty line anywhere in the country.

These abuses seem to disproportionately impact the immigrant population in New York City because it is immigrants that fill the majority of these positions. The two largest groups impacted are Asian and Hispanic immigrants. Many of these workers, despite being the subject of gross employment abuses fear recrimination or unemployment as retribution for hiring employment law firms to present their grievances.

So what does the future hold for these oppressed salon workers?  Is there a roadmap to relief from the onslaught of abuses they sustain daily?  The Salon industry does not seem poised to make meaningful changes on its own.  State Salon Licensing Boards and Government Agencies are currently overwhelmed with large caseloads offering no relief for these hard working employees.  The one thing that is certain is that until someone does more than just study the conditions for this large group of workers their lives will not improve.

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